Starring Sunita Mani, Aixa Maldonano, Paul Hatter, Allie Lemelle, and Daniel Kwan.  

Shot by Larkin Seiple, Production Designed by Jason Kisvarday and Kesli Ephraim and the gang, edited by DANIELS & Paul Rogers, VFX by Zak Stoltz, Produced by Jon Wang, Candice Ouaknine, Judy Craig, Styist Corban Poorboy, Makeup Eleanor Marks, Catering from the incomparable Stef Lynch, Colored by Ricky Gausis @ MPC, commissioned by Mr. Bryan Younce, and so many other awesome people helped so thank you to everyone.  Here’s the new video.  

     The two best movies of 2013 were both written by Spike Jonze.  You’ve all heard about Her.  It’s gorgeous and brilliant and moving. Everyone’s talking about it and all for good reasons.  But nobody’s talking about Bad Grandpa.
     Bad Grandpa is old white Borat running around with a little kid freaking people out.  But amazingly the film has a story.   Not just a story.  Themes!?  Not just that either, perhaps it simply caught me on just the right day, but this movie filled me with empathy and excitement about life, America, and the power of cinema.  Like Her, it has Heart.  
     Bad Grandpa's greatest asset is that it was just supposed to be some stunts and pranks.  That's what we all expected.  Goofs and spoofs.  So I went to the 4 dollar movie theater near my house with some friends and a theater full of latino families, teenagers, and some 5 and 6 year olds.  Great crowd.  I highly recommend watching this movie with your moms & dads, neighbors, coworkers, the childhood friends you struggle to reconnect with, ex girlfriends, brand new friends… You get it.  Different kinds of folks.  Then just marvel at how you find common ground watching the film.  We're all human.  We all get our dicks stuck in the proverbial soda machine from time to time.  And we all just want to find love.  I'm not joking.  The central theme of Her and Bad Grandpa is the same.  
     Through a series of expertly orchestrated scenes with real people, Bad Grandpa explores generational angst, race relations, the battle of the sexes, and stereotypes in general.  No really.  And not in a preachy way.  The film is like a cultural petri dish.  In a series of experiments, we get to see how people really treat each other when an old white man shows up in an all black male strip club and lets it all hang out, or a little boy dresses in drag at a beauty pageant.  And the results of these experiments will surprise you.  When you’re dick’s stuck in the soda machine, some folks will ignore you, others laugh and film with their phones, some folks run, and some folks are brave enough to walk over and try to help you out.  How beautiful is that?!  
     By the end of the film, you’re overwhelmed with empathy.  Borat shined a light on prejudice and simple mindedness in America.  Conversely, 7 years later, Bad Grandpa shows us that perhaps people aren’t as stupid and mean as we thought.  Amazingly the biggest laughs coincide with real emotion.  When a boy says 'I love you' to a complete stranger, or later when a stranger furiously whispers to an actor portraying a bad dad, 'that boy is worth more than money.  He's worth more than money.'   
     It’s why people should make movies.  Let’s challenge our preconceptions about other cultures, about raising children, about people with different beliefs than our own.  Let’s test the limits of our social construct called America.  And most of all, let’s have fun off camera, on camera, AND in the theatre.   Also, some of the goofs and spoofs are like super funny.  

     The two best movies of 2013 were both written by Spike Jonze.  You’ve all heard about Her.  It’s gorgeous and brilliant and moving. Everyone’s talking about it and all for good reasons.  But nobody’s talking about Bad Grandpa.

     Bad Grandpa is old white Borat running around with a little kid freaking people out.  But amazingly the film has a story.   Not just a story.  Themes!?  Not just that either, perhaps it simply caught me on just the right day, but this movie filled me with empathy and excitement about life, America, and the power of cinema.  Like Her, it has Heart.  
     Bad Grandpa's greatest asset is that it was just supposed to be some stunts and pranks.  That's what we all expected.  Goofs and spoofs.  So I went to the 4 dollar movie theater near my house with some friends and a theater full of latino families, teenagers, and some 5 and 6 year olds.  Great crowd.  I highly recommend watching this movie with your moms & dads, neighbors, coworkers, the childhood friends you struggle to reconnect with, ex girlfriends, brand new friends… You get it.  Different kinds of folks.  Then just marvel at how you find common ground watching the film.  We're all human.  We all get our dicks stuck in the proverbial soda machine from time to time.  And we all just want to find love.  I'm not joking.  The central theme of Her and Bad Grandpa is the same.  
     Through a series of expertly orchestrated scenes with real people, Bad Grandpa explores generational angst, race relations, the battle of the sexes, and stereotypes in general.  No really.  And not in a preachy way.  The film is like a cultural petri dish.  In a series of experiments, we get to see how people really treat each other when an old white man shows up in an all black male strip club and lets it all hang out, or a little boy dresses in drag at a beauty pageant.  And the results of these experiments will surprise you.  When you’re dick’s stuck in the soda machine, some folks will ignore you, others laugh and film with their phones, some folks run, and some folks are brave enough to walk over and try to help you out.  How beautiful is that?!  
     By the end of the film, you’re overwhelmed with empathy.  Borat shined a light on prejudice and simple mindedness in America.  Conversely, 7 years later, Bad Grandpa shows us that perhaps people aren’t as stupid and mean as we thought.  Amazingly the biggest laughs coincide with real emotion.  When a boy says 'I love you' to a complete stranger, or later when a stranger furiously whispers to an actor portraying a bad dad, 'that boy is worth more than money.  He's worth more than money.'   
     It’s why people should make movies.  Let’s challenge our preconceptions about other cultures, about raising children, about people with different beliefs than our own.  Let’s test the limits of our social construct called America.  And most of all, let’s have fun off camera, on camera, AND in the theatre.   Also, some of the goofs and spoofs are like super funny.  

BROOMSHAKALAKA (An interesting gift idea)

From the minds of Justin Becker and Steve Clemmons.  Great job everybody who worked on this.  

It’s officially released to the world!  We did an official Jack Johnson music video at camp this year.  Most fun shoot ever.  

Check out an interview of how the project came to be over at IMVDB   http://imvdb.com/blog/2013/11/video-chats-daniel-scheinert-on-radiate-by-jack-johnson-directed-by-omg-everywhere

Check out our London OMG camp.  This was an inspiring week filled with crazy awesome kids and volunteers.  

GET READY FOR THE FINALE PROJECTS dropping online soon!

My boy Billy Chew is typing dumb dialogue onto pictures and calling it poetry.

It’s the best.  So go read all of it.

[just so yall know billy is the star of Puppets and Pockets, and it was his incomparable screenwriting skills that came with the concluding line: "Also I’ll hold your stuff."]

My boy Billy Chew is typing dumb dialogue onto pictures and calling it poetry.

It’s the best.  So go read all of it.

[just so yall know billy is the star of Puppets and Pockets, and it was his incomparable screenwriting skills that came with the concluding line: "Also I’ll hold your stuff."]

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2007100253/racine-dor-a-new-piece-by-movement-workshop-group

Kickstart an Amazing Dance Piece

Our amazing choreographer Leslie Guyton who choreographed the Houdini dance for Foster the People is raising money for a new dance piece.  Her whole dance collective ‘Movement Workshop Group’ is a spectacular group of people.  Check out the link and support them if you can.